In another sense..

The so‐called placebo effect should be acknowledged as important, should be respected and used. The ability of one’s mind to help one feel better is a key aspect of healing. It does not, I think, necessarily depend on being silly or fooled. I would like to see methods of healing harness this resource
deliberately and wisely. To this end, I am particularly interested in techniques such as healing touch, which are often described in terms of “energy.”
Note here that I am using the word “energy” to identify an experience of human perception, the “feeling energy”meaning of the word.
“Energy”—as a physicist would use the term, a property of physical systems, that can be converted or transferred but not created or destroyed, measured in ergs or joules—is another meaning of the word.
I have speculated: Some human perceptions have been called spiritual, energy, or some such. These may to some extent be perceptions—or, perhaps as often, imaginations— using senses (perhaps primitive senses) that generally don’t get much attention. (What they are not: magnetic or electromagnetic phenomena… as these are known to physics.1)
I am thinking about proprioception (our perception of ourbodies position in space) and also about that sense of proximity that feels tactile, the feel on your skin when you put your hand near your face, the sensation of something‐near.2  I imagine in these senses, partly, in creating visual art.
I suspect that these sense perceptions may be particularly effective in enabling placebo healing, because they are body‐focused, because they might sneak behind the front of our minds to bring into play our ability to feel better.
1. Of course it is not impossible that unknown factors come
into play. I don’t know about that.
2. This perception is clear to me, but I am not assuming it is
reliable.

From Molten Wood and Feral Ideas  chasens.ca/book

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